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Tag Archives: desktops

Three years of the XPRT Weekly Tech Spotlight

February marked the three-year anniversary of the XPRT Weekly Tech Spotlight, and we now have over 150 devices in our Spotlight library! We started the Spotlight to provide consumers with objective information on device hardware and performance, and to provide vendors with a trusted third-party showcase for their gear. Each week, we measure and verify the Spotlight device’s specs ourselves, never relying on vendor-published data. We also test each device with every applicable XPRT benchmark, and publish the data that lets consumers know how a device measures up to its competitors.

Over the past three years, we’ve featured a wide array of devices:

  • 49 phones
  • 28 laptops
  • 26 tablets
  • 24 2-in-1 devices
  • 12 small-form-factor PCs
  • 7 desktops
  • 6 game consoles
  • 6 all-in-ones

 

In addition to a wide variety of device types, we try to include a wide range of vendors. We’ve featured devices from ACEPC, Acer, Alcatel, Alienware, Amazon, Apple, ASUS, Barnes and Noble, BlackBerry, BLU, CHUWI, Dell, Essential, Fujitsu, Fusion5, Google, Honor, HP, HTC, Huawei, Intel, LeEco, Lenovo, LG, Microsoft, MINIX, Motorola, Nokia, NVIDIA, OnePlus, Razer, Samsung, Sony, Syber, Xiaomi, and ZTE.

XPRT Spotlight is a great way for device vendors and manufacturers to share PT-verified specs and test results with buyers around the world. We test many of the devices that appear each year and will test—at no charge—any device a manufacturer or vendor sends us. If you’d like us to test your device, please contact us at XPRTSpotlight@PrincipledTechnologies.com.

There’s a lot more to come for the XPRT Spotlight, and we’re constantly working on new features and improvements for the page. Are there any specific devices or features that you would like to see in the Spotlight? Let us know.

Justin

HDXPRT 4 is here!

We’re excited to announce that HDXPRT 4 is now available to the public! Just like previous versions of HDXPRT, HDXPRT 4 uses trial versions of commercial applications to complete real-world media tasks. The HDXPRT 4 installation package includes installers for some of those programs, such as Audacity and HandBrake. For other programs, such as Adobe Photoshop Elements and CyberLink Media Espresso, users will need to download the necessary installers prior to testing by using the links and instructions in the HDXPRT 4 User Manual.

In addition to the editing photos, editing music, and converting videos workloads from prior versions of the benchmark, HDXPRT 4 includes two new Photoshop Elements scenarios. The first utilizes an AI tool that corrects closed eyes in photos, and the second creates a single panoramic photo from seven separate photos.

HDXPRT 4 is compatible with systems running Windows 10, and is available for download at HDXPRT.com. The installation package is about 4.8 GB, so the download may take several minutes. The setup process takes about 30 minutes on most computers, and a standard test run takes approximately an hour.

After trying out HDXPRT 4, please submit your scores here and send any comments to BenchmarkXPRTsupport@principledtechnologies.com. To see test results from a variety of systems, go to HDXPRT.com and click View Results, where you’ll find scores from a variety of devices. We look forward to seeing your results!

More on the way for the XPRT Weekly Tech Spotlight

In the coming months, we’ll continue to add more devices and helpful features to the XPRT Weekly Tech Spotlight. We’re especially interested in adding data points and visual aids that make it easier to quickly understand the context of each device’s test scores. For instance, those of us who are familiar with WebXPRT 3 scores know that an overall score of 250 is pretty high, but site visitors who are unfamiliar with WebXPRT probably won’t know how that score compares to scores for other devices.

We designed Spotlight to be a source of objective data, in contrast to sites that provide subjective ratings for devices. As we pursue our goal of helping users make sense of scores, we want to maintain this objectivity and avoid presenting information in ways that could be misleading.

Introducing comparison aids to the site is forcing us to make some tricky decisions. Because we value input from XPRT community members, we’d love to hear your thoughts on one of the questions we’re facing: How should our default view present a device’s score?

We see three options:

1) Present the device’s score in relation to the overall high and low scores for that benchmark across all devices.
2) Present the device’s score in relation to the overall high and low scores for that benchmark across the broad category of devices to which that device belongs (e.g., phones).
3) Present the device’s score in relation to the overall high and low scores for that benchmark across a narrower sub-category of devices to which that device belongs (e.g., high-end flagship phones).

To think this through, consider WebXPRT, which runs on desktops, laptops, phones, tablets, and other devices. Typically, the WebXPRT scores for phones and tablets are lower than scores for desktop and laptop systems. The first approach helps to show just how fast high-end desktops and laptops handle the WebXPRT workloads, but it could make a phone or tablet look slow, even if its score was good for its category. The second approach would prevent unfair default comparisons between different device types but would still present comparisons between devices that are not true competitors (e.g., flagship phones vs. budget phones). The third approach is the most careful, but would introduce an element of subjectivity because determining the sub-category in which a device belongs is not always clear cut.

Do you have thoughts on this subject, or recommendations for Spotlight in general? If so, Let us know.

Justin

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