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Category: Performance of computing devices

Here’s to 100 more!

This week’s Essential Phone entry marks the 100th device that we’ve featured in the XPRT Weekly Tech Spotlight! It’s a notable milestone for us as we work toward our goal of building a substantial library of device information that buyers can use to compare devices. In celebration, I thought it would be fun to share [...]

Digging deeper

From time to time, we like to revisit the fundamentals of the XPRT approach to benchmark development. Today, we’re discussing the need for testers and benchmark developers to consider the multiple factors that influence benchmark results. For every device we test, all of its hardware and software components have the potential to affect performance, and [...]

IDF16 Shenzhen

I just spent the last couple of days at IDF16 Shenzhen. It was a great opportunity to talk to folks about the XPRTs, see some future technology demos, and think about the future of the XPRTs. The technology and product demos included lots of interesting technology. I saw everything from the latest computers to games [...]

A clarification from Brett Howse

A couple of weeks ago, I described a conversation I had with Brett Howse of AnandTech. Brett was kind enough to send a clarification of some of his remarks, which he gave us permission to share with you. “We are at a point in time where the technology that’s been called mobile since its inception [...]

Comparing apples and oranges?

My first day at CES, I had breakfast with Brett Howse from AnandTech. It was a great opportunity to get the perspective of a savvy tech journalist and frequent user of the XPRTs. During our conversation, Brett raised concerns about comparing mobile devices to PCs. As mobile devices get more powerful, the performance and capability [...]

Question we get a lot

“How come your benchmark ranks devices differently than [insert other benchmark here]?” It’s a fair question, and the reason is that each benchmark has its own emphasis and tests different things. When you think about it, it would be unusual if all benchmarks did agree. To illustrate the phenomenon, consider this excerpt from a recent [...]

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