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Category: Application-based benchmarks

The HDXPRT 4 Community Preview is now available!

Today we’re releasing the HDXPRT 4 Community Preview (CP). Just like previous versions of HDXPRT, HDXPRT 4 uses trial versions of commercial applications to complete workload tasks. For some of those programs, such as Audacity and HandBrake, HDXPRT 4 includes installers in the HDXPRT installation package. For other programs, such as Adobe Photoshop Elements 2018 [...]

HDXPRT 4: Getting it right

For BenchmarkXPRT Development Community members anticipating the HDXPRT 4 Community Preview (CP), we want to thank you for your patience and explain where we are in the release process. This past month has brought a flurry of activity in the Windows 10 development world. We’ve been testing HDXPRT 4 extensively on each of the new [...]

HDXPRT 4: A little lighter and a lot faster

This week, we’re sharing a little more about the upcoming HDXPRT 4 Community Preview. Just like previous versions of HDXPRT, HDXPRT 4 will use trial versions of commercial applications to complete workload tasks. We will include installers for some of those programs, such as Audacity and HandBrake, in the HDXPRT installation package. For other programs, [...]

What’s next for HDXPRT?

A few months ago, we discussed some initial ideas for the next version of HDXPRT, including updating the benchmark’s workloads and real-world trial applications and improving the look and feel of the UI. This week, we’d like to share more about the status of the HDXPRT development process. We’re planning to keep HDXPRT’s three test [...]

A new reality

A while back, I wrote about a VR demo built by students from North Carolina State University. We’ve been checking it out over the last couple of months and are very impressed. This workload will definitely heat up your device! While the initial results look promising, this is still an experimental workload and it’s too [...]

Experience is the best teacher

One of the core principles that guides the design of the XPRT tools is they should reflect the way real-world users use their devices. The XPRTs try to use applications and workloads that reflect what users do and the way that real applications function. How did we learn how important this is? The hard way—by [...]